Lego commits to 100% renewable energy goal

LEGO logo

LEGO logo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Superb news!

 

This makes me feel waaayyy less guilty for supporting my child’s Lego habit – a tradition in our family and almost every family I know.

 

Thanks to WWF partnering with Lego, one more giant, recognizable and valued consumer good is having less impact on our planet.

 

Commenting on the new partnership, the LEGO Group’s CEO, Jørgen Vig Knudstorp, said: “We have experienced strong growth for eight consecutive years and, as we grow, we are becoming increasingly aware of the impact we leave on the planet. Partnering with WWF is an important step in our efforts to get the best out of our sustainability initiatives. We are proud to contribute to WWF’s overall vision of 100% renewable energy by 2050 and already now they have played a part in the targets we have set – and how we can achieve them.”

More information about this…

 

New report set to rock the climate change denier camp: science as settled as it gets

In my community of people who care immensely about the stability of our atmosphere… and thus biosphere… and thus human civilization, it sometimes is forgotten that there are a number of people who still have trouble grappling with this issue.

This week, as usual, my colleagues and I were considering various aspects of the climate system and how BC’s land base, economy and population could possibly adjust to reduce or remove carbon in the atmosphere (we have legislated targets to meet in BC). And then a fact was stated that shook even us: permafrost now contains 1,700 billion tonnes of carbon, or twice the amount now in the atmosphere… and it’s melting. And if we don’t reverse our emissions trend, like tomorrow, it will continue to melt faster.

I often hear the words “game over” during such revelations.  Unfortunately, we have them more often than we’d like… Sometimes even the experts need reminding of how important it is we do all we can, and then lead others to do the same.

On the other side, we’re lucky in BC to generally have a public mindset that enables our political leadership to take action. However, we still don’t see 100% of British Columbian’s REALLY sure that this problem warrants the challenge of tackling it, which will include making uncomfortable changes at times.

I can talk all I want about what I know and why it matters…. but if a person has doubt about whether my expertise is agreed upon by other scientists, I may as well be a pollster.

So here it is:

And why does this mater so much? How about a good ole short film to help us understand:

Thank you Sandy. Thank you Obama. Thank you Jacobson.

I really only have gratitude at the moment. When it all sinks in, I’ll probably come up with something more profound.

Let’s be fair to those who are responsible for making Canadians happy: it isn’t easy. That is probably the extent of it… yes there are a diversity of beliefs and priorities, and sometimes they conflict. But that is what they signed up for: a difficult job, in the most difficult century we may yet know as a species.

Canada has an ally in the United States. As a trading partner, among other things. So, as we all work towards transitioning our society to be low carbon and resilient towards climate change, what happens in the US (at times) will signal eventual spillover into our communities. Not to mention the fact that the Government of Canada has been explicit in its approach to align policies and approaches to climate change mitigation with the US.

So thank you, United States of America. Thank you for making it easier for the Canadians holding the levers on climate action. Thank you for sharing your stories of tragedy in the wake of Hurricane Sandy and recognizing it as a harbinger of tribulation. Thank you for leading your citizens and hopefully the world, as you usually do, this time in a direction we desperately need to go.

And finally, thank you, US Ambassador to Canada, David Jacobson, for spelling this out to Canada. You’ve made our job easier.

Obama’s climate change challenge meant for Canada’s ears: ambassador

Heather Scoffield and Mike Blanchfield,  Wednesday, February 13, 2013 5:55 PM
U.S. ambassador to Canada David Jacobson delivers a speech on the impact of the U.S. election on Canadian-American relations, Tuesday, December 4, 2012 in Montreal. The U.S. ambassador to Canada says President Barack Obama's State of the Union message to act swiftly on climate change should be interpreted as a challenge to Ottawa as well. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

U.S. ambassador to Canada David Jacobson delivers a speech on the impact of the U.S. election on Canadian-American relations, Tuesday, December 4, 2012 in Montreal. The U.S. ambassador to Canada says President Barack Obama’s State of the Union message to act swiftly on climate change should be interpreted as a challenge to Ottawa as well. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz
 OTTAWA – President Barack Obama’s State of the Union message to act swiftly on climate change should be interpreted as a challenge to Ottawa as well, says the U.S. ambassador to Canada.

Obama used Tuesday’s speech to present Congress with a choice: either agree to market-based solutions to climate change, or else the president will use his executive powers to achieve the same result.

In an interview with The Canadian Press, Ambassador David Jacobson said the message to move more aggressively against climate change was meant as much for Canada as it was for the United States.

“We all need to do as much as we can. And that is true in your country and in mine,” Jacobson said.

“Obviously the more that the energy industry – whether it is the oilsands in Canada or the energy industry in the United States, or any place else – the more progress they can make to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, to reduce their consumption of water, to other environmental consequences, the better off we all are.”

Read more on Global News: Global Edmonton | Obama’s climate change challenge meant for Canada’s ears: ambassador

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